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October 28, 2006

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Хичээл №1

Module 1 : Installing Windows XP Professional
Overview
Introduction As a Microsoft® Windows® XP Professional support
professional, one of your tasks may be to install the operating system.
There are several ways to install Windows XP Professional, and each installation
method requires that you carefully plan for the installation and choose
correct setup options during the installation. Familiarity with the available
options and setup procedures will help you deploy Windows XP Professional
efficiently.
Objectives After completing this module, you will be able to:
+ Plan an installation of Windows XP Professional.
+ Install Windows XP Professional from a compact disc (CD) and over a network.

+ Upgrade to Windows XP Professional.
+ Transfer user settings and files by using the User State Migration Tool
(USMT).
+ Activate Windows XP Professional and troubleshoot failed installations.
Lesson:
Planning an Installation of Microsoft Windows XP Professional
Introduction When you run the Windows XP Professional Setup program, you
must provide information about how to install and configure the operating
system. Thorough planning can make your installation of Windows XP Professional
more efficient by helping you to avoid potential problems during installation.
An understanding of the configuration options will also help to ensure that
you have properly configured your system.
Lesson objectives After completing this lesson, you will be able to:

Checking System Requirements

Introduction Windows XP Professional can be run only on computers that
meet the minimum hardware requirements.
Before installing Windows XP Professional, you must make sure that your
system meets the minimum requirements. The following table lists the minimum
system requirements and the recommended system levels for Windows XP Professional.

Component Minimum system requirements Recommended system levels

Lesson objectives
After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
+ Identify minimum system requirements for installing Windows XP Professional.
+ Determine whether hardware and software components are compatible with Windows XP Professional.
+ Identify disk partitioning options.
+ Describe the differences between file systems and how to choose among them.
+ Describe the differences between workgroups and domains.
+ Complete a pre-installation checklist.

Windows XP Professional can be run only on computers that meet the minimum hardware requirements.
Before installing Windows XP Professional, you must make sure that your system meets the minimum requirements. The following table lists the minimum system requirements and the recommended system levels for Windows XP Professional.

Component

Minimum system requirements

Recommended system levels

CPU (up to two)

P2 233 megahertz (MHz) or equivalent

P2 300 MHz or equivalent

RAM (minimum and

64 megabytes (MB) / 

128 MB / 4 GB

maximum)

4 gigabytes (GB) 

 

Hard disk space

2 GB hard disk with 650

2 GB free hard disk space

 

MB free space (additional if

 

 

installing over a network)

 

Maximum hard disk

2 terabytes

2 terabytes 

space on partition

 

 

Partition size

1.5 GB

2 GB

Display

VGA-compatible or higher

SVGA-compatible display

 

display adapter; monitor

adapter

 

capable of 800þ600 display

 

Accessories

Keyboard and mouse or

Keyboard and mouse or

 

other pointing device

other pointing device

For CD-ROM

CD-ROM drive

12x or faster CD-ROM

installation

 

drive

For network

Network client or boot disk

Network client or boot disk

installation

 

 

Recommended The recommended additional free disk space on the partition on which you additional free disk install Windows XP Professional is used for optional components such as user space accounts, logs, future service packs, and also for the paging file used by the
operating system. A partition is a dedicated space on the hard drive. The
recommended 2 GB partition allows for additional space for files that
applications installed on the computer may require in the Windows directory.

Checking Hardware and Software Compatibility
Introduction                            After you determine that your system meets the minimum requirements, you must verify that your hardware and software are compatible with Windows XP Professional. You can check hardware by using the Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) or by generating a compatibility report.
Verifying hardware You can ensure that your hardware is compatible with Windows XP compatibility by using Professional by verifying that all hardware devices are listed on the HCL. the HCL Microsoft provides tested device drivers for devices that are listed on the HCL.
Using hardware that is not on the HCL may result in problems during or after installation. For a copy of the Windows XP Professional HCL, see the Hcl.txt file in the support folder on the Windows XP Professional CD. For the most up-to-date version of the HCL, see the Microsoft Windows XP Professional HCL Web site at http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx
Generating a compatibility report
Important Microsoft supports only devices listed on the HCL. If you have hardware that is not listed on the HCL, contact the hardware manufacturer to determine if there is a manufacturer-supported driver that is compatible with Windows XP Professional.
Windows XP Professional provides a report-only mode that can generate compatibility reports. To generate a report, an operating system must be installed on the computer. These reports provide you with information about incompatible hardware and software before you perform an installation or an upgrade. You can analyze these reports to determine whether your hardware is compatible with Windows XP Professional or whether you need to install update packs or new versions of applications. 
Using the UpgradeAdvisor 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Software compatibility

You can generate a compatibility report by running the Microsoft Windows Upgrade Advisor. The Upgrade Advisor checks the existing hardware and software to determine if any unrecognized or incompatible hardware or software is installed on your system.
To run the Upgrade Advisor, insert the product CD and then run winnt32, using the /checkupgradeonly switch. For example, if your CD-ROM is drive E, you would type E:\I386\Winnt32 /checkupgradeonly. The Upgrade Advisor will display a system compatibility report, which can then be viewed in detail or saved. The default name is Upgrade.txt, and the default save location is the Windows folder on the local drive. 
To analyze the upgrade readiness of a large number of computers, you can run the Upgrade Advisor as part of an organization-wide logon script, and store the results in a central location for later evaluation.
If you perform a new installation, you might not need the information on software compatibility; in fact, there may not be any existing software. However, the software information is essential during an upgrade. 
Note Because of the differences in the system registry and setup procedures, many applications install differently on computers running Microsoft Windows 98 than they do on computers running Microsoft Windows NT® Workstation, Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional, and Windows XP Professional. Therefore, if you are upgrading from Windows 98, you may need to reinstall certain software.

 

Determining Disk Partitioning Options
Introduction                            Disk partitioning is a way of dividing the physical disk so that each section functions as a separate unit. When you create partitions on a disk, you divide the disk into one or more areas that can be formatted for use by a file system, such as a FAT (file allocation table), FAT32, or NTFS file system. In accordance with the minimum system requirements, the partition on which you install Windows XP Professional must have no less than 1.5 GB of free space. It is strongly recommended that the partition be at least 2 GB.
Partitioning options               When you perform an installation from a CD, the Setup program examines the hard disk to determine its existing configuration. After the configuration is determined, Setup will offer the following options if available:
¢ Create a new partition on an unpartitioned hard disk.
If the hard disk is unpartitioned, you can create and size the partition on which you will install Windows XP Professional.
Important If you make the entire disk one partition, you will not be able to repartition the disk later without either reinstalling the operating system or using a third-party tool. 
¢ Create a new partition on a partitioned hard disk.
If the hard disk is already partitioned but has enough unpartitioned disk space, you can create an additional partition in the unpartitioned space.
¢ Install on an existing partition.
If the hard disk already has a partition that is large enough, you can install Windows XP Professional on that partition. If the partition has an existing operating system, you will overwrite that operating system if you accept the default installation path. However, files other than the operating system files, such as program files and data files, will not be overwritten.
¢ Delete an existing partition.
If the hard disk has an existing partition, you can delete it to create more
unpartitioned space for the new partition. Deleting an existing partition
erases all data on that partition.
If you select a new partition during Setup, create and size only the partition on which you will install Windows XP Professional. After installation, use Disk Management to partition the remaining space on the hard disk.
Note Disk Management is a system utility for managing hard disks and the volumes or partitions that they contain. For more information about disk management, see Module 4, —Managing Disks,“ in Course 2272, Implementing and Supporting Microsoft Windows XP Professional.

Important Choosing a file system other than NTFS means that every user has full access to all files, including system files on the computer. You should always choose NTFS as the file system, even in dual -boot scenarios (you can store all the information that needs to be accessible from both operating systems in a partition that does not contain Windows XP). 

Choosing the Appropriate File System: FAT, FAT32, or the NTFS File System
Introduction                            After you create the partition on which you will install Windows XP Professional, you can use Setup to select the file system with which to format the partition. Windows XP Professional supports the NTFS file system in addition to the FAT and FAT32 file systems.
Note File systems and disk management are covered in detail in a later module. This module provides only enough information to help you make an installation decision.
NTFS                                         NTFS is the recommended file system for Windows XP Professional because it provides a higher level of security and enables file compression. Use NTFS for partitions that require:
¢ File- and folder-level security. You can control access to files and folders. ¢ File compression. You can compress files to create more storage space. ¢ Disk quotas. You can control disk usage on a per-user basis. ¢ File encryption.  You can transparently encrypt file data.
Windows XP Professional, Windows 2000, and Windows NT are the only Microsoft operating systems that you can use to gain access to data on a local hard disk that is formatted with NTFS. If you plan to gain access to files that are on a local Windows XP Professional partition with the Microsoft Windows 95 or Windows 98 operating systems installed on it, you should format the partition with a FAT or FAT32 file system. 
FAT and FAT32

Normally, you would not use FAT to format the partition on which Windows XP Professional resides because it does not have the file- and folder-level security that NTFS provides. However, if you do not require the security and compression features that are available with NTFS, or if you require a dual- boot configuration to run applications that are not compatible with Windows XP Professional, you might need to use FAT32.
Neither FAT nor FAT32 provides file- and folder-level security, and FAT supports no partitions larger than 2 GB. If you attempt to use FAT to format a partition larger than 2 GB, Setup automatically formats the partition with FAT32. 
Note When you upgrade an operating system on an existing FAT or FAT32 partition to Windows XP Professional, you have the option to use NTFS or FAT32. If you choose NTFS, you can convert the partition to NTFS or format the partition using NTFS. If the partition contains data that you want to keep after the installation, do not format the partition. Instead, choose to convert the partition to NTFS to preserve the data.
Important Some operating systems, such as Microsoft MS-DOS® 6.22 or earlier and Windows 95, do not recognize partitions that are formatted with FAT32 or NTFS file systems. 

Deciding on a Workgroup or Domain Installation
Introduction                            Before installing Windows XP Professional, you must decide if you will install the operating system in a workgroup or domain configuration. 
Workgroup A workgroup is a small group of computers on a network that enables users to characteristics work together and does not support centralized administration.
A workgroup has the following characteristics:
¢ Resources can be located on each computer in the workgroup.
¢ Administration and authentication of users are performed on each computer in the workgroup.
¢ Each computer has its own local Security Accounts Manager (SAM) database. A user must have a user account on each computer to which that user needs to gain access to resources.
¢ A workgroup becomes more difficult to manage as it becomes larger.
¢ Windows XP Professional can support only ten simultaneous incoming connections.
Note If you are installing Windows XP Professional on a stand-alone computer, you will install it into a workgroup configuration.
Domain characteristics          A domain is a logical grouping of computers on a network that has a central security database for storing security information. Centralized security and administration are important for computers in a domain because they enable an administrator to easily manage computers that are geographically distant from each other. A domain is administered as a unit with common rules and procedures. Each domain has a unique name, and each computer within a domain has a unique name.
A domain has the following characteristics:
¢ Resources, administration, and authentication are centralized.
¢ One directory database in Windows 2000 environments, which stores all of the user and computer accounts for the domain. This database is used by the Active Directory® directory service. A user needs only one domain user account in Active Directory to gain access to shared network resources in the domain.
¢ Easily supports a small group of computers to thousands of computers.
Joining a domain                    In a domain, each computer has a computer account. When a computer joins a domain, the appropriate user and computer accounts must exist. Before you can add a computer to a domain:
¢ The person performing the installation must have a user account in Active Directory. This account does not need to be the domain Administrator account.
œ and œ
¢ The computer must have an existing computer account in the Active Directory database of the domain that the computer is joining, and the computer must be named exactly as its domain account is named.
œ or œ
¢ The person performing the installation must have appropriate permission to create a domain account for the computer during installation.
Workgroup vs. domain

Note All users with user accounts in Active Directory can create up to 10 domain computer accounts without having additional permissions.
Typically, the Network Administrator or Network Architect decides whether to install Windows XP Professional in a workgroup or domain. If the Network Administrator or Network Architect does not make the decision, the Microsoft Windows XP Professional Pre-Installation Checklist (located in the Jobaids folder on the Student Materials CD), can help you decide whether to install Windows XP Professional in a workgroup or domain. However, if you review the checklist and are still unsure, join a workgroup, because you can join the domain after completing the installation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completing a Pre-Installation Checklist
Introduction                            One way to ensure that you are prepared for your installation is to complete a pre-installation checklist.
Pre-installation checklist Before installing Windows XP Professional, use a pre-installation checklist to items help you complete the following:
¢ Verify that the computer hardware meets the minimum system requirements.
¢ Verify that all hardware appears on the HCL, or that the hardware manufacturer provides drivers that are compatible with Windows XP Professional.
¢ Determine how you will partition the hard disk during installation.
¢ Select the file system that is appropriate for your installation. It is recommended that you use NTFS, unless you have specific reasons not to do so.
¢ Decide whether you will install Windows XP Professional in a workgroup or a domain, and ensure that the appropriate accounts are created prior to installation.
Note A pre-installation checklist job aid, —Microsoft Windows XP Professional Pre-installation Checklist,“ is included in the Jobaids folder on the Student Materials CD.

Lesson: Installing Windows XP Professional
Introduction                            You can install Windows XP Professional from a product CD or over a network. 
There are three tasks to perform when you install Windows XP Professional from a CD: run the Setup program, complete the Setup Wizard, and install network components.
When installing Windows XP Professional over a network, the installation process is the same as an installation from a product CD, but there are requirements that must be met before the installation can begin. These requirements include creating a partition to prepare the client computer, enabling network connectivity on the client computer, and connecting to the distribution server.
Lesson objectives                   After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
¢ Install Windows XP Professional from a product CD.
¢ Install Windows XP Professional over a network.
Installing Windows XP Professional from a Product CD
Introduction You will perform a new installation, sometimes called a —clean install,“ when: 
¢ There is no existing operating system on the partition on which you will install Windows XP Professional. 
œ or œ
¢ You want to completely remove and replace the existing operating system on the partition. 
Becoming familiar with the tasks that are necessary for installation and with the most common post-installation tasks will help ensure that Windows XP Professional is successfully installed on client computers so that users‘ work will not be impeded by operating system problems.
Running the Setup The first part of the Setup program is text-based, not a wizard. To run the Setup program program, perform the following steps:

  1. 1.         Start the computer from the CD.
  2. 2.         Select To Setup Windows XP Professional Now.
  3. 3.         Read and accept the licensing agreement.
  4. 4.         Select or create the partition on which you will install Windows XP Professional.

Important To have a choice of partitions, on the Install Options page, click Advanced Options, select I want to choose my drive letter or partition during Setup, click OK, and then finish the setup.
5.  Select a file system for the installation partition. 
The computer will restart in graphical mode, and the installation will continue.
Completing the Setup After running the text-based portion of the Setup program, complete the Setup Wizard Wizard by performing the following steps:
1.  Click Customize to change regional settings, if necessary. The settings are described in the following table.
Setting                                        Description
Current System Locale           Affects how programs display dates, times, currency, and numbers. Choose the locale that matches your location, for example, French (Canada).
Current Keyboard Layout     Accommodates the special characters and symbols used in different languages. Your keyboard layout determines which characters appear when you press keys on the keyboard. 

  1. 2.         Type your name and organization.
  2. 3.         Type the product key.
    1. 4.         Type the computer name and a password for the local Administrator account. The local Administrator account resides in the SAM of the computer, not in Active Directory. If you will be installing in a domain, you need either a pre-assigned computer name for which a domain account has been created, or the right to create a computer account within the domain.
    2. Tip To increase security on your network, it is recommended that you require complex passwords that are hard for anyone else to guess. For best practices in password policies, see Module 10, —Configuring Windows XP Professional to Operate in Microsoft Networks,“ in Course 2272, Implementing and Supporting Microsoft Windows XP Professional.
  3. 5. Select the date, time, and time-zone settings.

Installing network After completing the Setup Wizard, the computer will restart. Install network components components by performing the following steps:
1.  Choose a network setting, and then click Next. The network settings are described in the following table. 
Setting            Description
Typical            Installs Client for Microsoft Networks, File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks, and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) using Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) assigned addresses.
Custom           Creates custom network connections; for example, configuring a static IP address, configuring the computer as a Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) client, or adding additional protocols.

  1. 2.         Provide a workgroup or domain name, and then click Next to begin installation. If you are installing into a domain, go to Step 3; if you are installing into a workgroup, you are finished. If you are joining a domain, you must enter the credentials of a user account that has permissions to join a computer to the domain.
  2. 3.         If you are installing to a domain, configure the network ID for the computer.

After restarting, Windows XP Professional displays the Network ID Wizard. In this wizard, you can do one of the following:

  1. •           Configure a local user account and password for the computer. 
  2. •           Choose not to configure a specific user account for the computer. When a user starts the computer, the Log On to Windows dialog box appears.

Installing Windows XP Professional over a Network
Introduction                            If you are installing Windows XP Professional from a networked server, the computer on which you will install Windows XP Professional must be able to connect to that server. After the computer is connected, you run the Setup program, and the installation is performed in the same way as an installation from a CD. 
Procedure for installing To install Windows XP Professional over a network:
Windows XP
Professional over a
1. Prepare the client computer. 

network                                                                        The client computer requires a formatted partition on which to copy the installation files. Create a partition of at least 650 MB (2 GB is recommended) and format it by using the FAT32 file system. You should use the FAT32 file system because a Windows 98 or MS-DOS network boot disk cannot read a partition that is formatted with NTFS.

    1. 2. Enable network connectivity. 
    2. If the client computer has an existing operating system, install a network client. If it does not have an operating system, boot from a client disk that includes a network client that enables the target computer to connect to the distribution server. Start the client computer by using the network client.
  1. 3. Connect to the distribution server. 

A distribution server contains the installation files from the i386 folder on the Windows XP Professional CD. These files must reside in a shared folder.

    1. 4. Run the Setup program. 
    2. If the client computer is running Windows 98, Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows NT, run Winnt32.exe from the shared folder to start the Setup program. If you are booting by using an MS-DOS-based network boot disk, run Winnt.exe. Setup will restart the computer after copying all files from the i386 folder to a temporary folder on the target computer.
  1. 5. Install Windows XP Professional.

From this point, installation from the server is the same as an installation from a CD-ROM.
Lesson: Upgrading to Microsoft Windows XP
Introduction                            You can upgrade most Windows client operating systems directly to Windows XP Professional. If you upgrade instead of doing a new installation, you will not lose the existing settings and applications on the partition.
When preparing for an upgrade, you should first complete the tasks listed on the pre-installation checklist that appears in the —Planning an Installation of Microsoft Windows XP Professional“ section of this module, and then prepare your system for the upgrade.
Preparing for an upgrade consists of these additional tasks:
¢ Identifying the upgrade path
¢ Preparing your system
When you upgrade, you can choose an Express Upgrade or the Custom option. The Custom option enables you to select the partition on which Windows XP Professional will be installed and to select special other non-standard options. 
Lesson objectives                   After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
¢ Identify the upgrade paths for Windows XP Professional.
¢ Identify the steps in preparing a computer for an upgrade.
¢ Choose an installation type.
¢ Upgrade computers running Windows 98.
¢ Upgrade computers running Windows 2000 or Windows NT 4.0 SP 5.
¢ Install Windows XP Professional in a dual-boot configuration.
Identifying Upgrade Paths
Introduction                            The following operating systems can be upgraded directly to Windows XP Professional:
¢ Windows 98
¢ Windows Millennium Edition
¢ Windows NT Workstation 4.0 SP 5
¢ Windows 2000 Professional
Intermediate upgrades          Consumer versions of Windows earlier than Windows 98 and business versions of Windows earlier than Windows NT 4.0 SP 5 will require an intermediate upgrade.
The following table shows the operating systems that require an additional step to be upgraded to Windows XP Professional.

If you are running

Upgrade to this operating system first

Versions of Microsoft NT Workstation

Windows NT 4.0 SP 5

earlier than version 4.0 SP 5

 

Windows 95

Windows 98

Note Although you can upgrade from Microsoft Windows 3.5.1 and Windows 95 to Windows XP Professional by using interim upgrades, the hardware available on computers running these older operating systems will probably not meet the minimum hardware requirements for Windows XP Professional.
Preparing Your System
Introduction Preparing your system for an upgrade is as important as planning an
installation. Systems that are not properly prepared may have problems during
or after the upgrade. 
System preparation Use the following tasks to prepare your system for upgrade. tasks
¢ Determine hardware and software compatibility. 
Microsoft provides a compatibility tool at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/upgrading/advisor.mspx.
You can also run the Windows Upgrade Advisor
(Winnt32.exe /checkupgradeonly).
¢ Install hardware and software updates as necessary.
Review your current system information and compatibility reports, and then obtain hardware and software updates from your hardware or software manufacturer. It is particularly important to ensure that you have the latest BIOS (basic input/output system) that is available from your computer manufacturer. If the computer has BIOS antivirus enabled, you must disable this option.
¢ Back up files.
Use the Backup Wizard to back up your files to a disk, a tape drive, or another computer on your network.
¢ Scan for viruses.
Use antivirus software to scan for and eradicate any viruses on your hard
disk. 
¢ Uncompress compressed drives.
Uncompress any drive compressed by using DriveSpace, DoubleSpace, or any compression method other than NTFS compression before upgrading to Windows XP Professional. Do not upgrade to Windows XP Professional on a compressed drive unless the drive was compressed with the NTFS file system compression feature. 
¢ Uninstall incompatible software.
Certain types of software may be incompatible with Windows XP Professional and should be removed prior to upgrading. While not every instance of the following types of software will be incompatible, these software types may be incompatible:

  1. •           Third-party networking protocols and third-party client software that do not have an update in the i386\Winntupg folder on the Windows XP Professional CD-ROM.
  2. •           Antivirus applications and disk quota software, because of the changes in the version of NTFS used in Windows NT 4.0 and later versions.
  3. •           Custom power management software or tools, because the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) and Advanced Power Management (APM) features in Windows XP Professional replace these tools.

 

Choosing an Installation Type
Introduction                            When you perform an upgrade to Windows XP Professional, you can select an
Express upgrade or a Custom upgrade. Upgrade An Upgrade will automatically upgrade your Windows installation in the (Recommended) existing operating system folder, and maintain all existing settings. An express
upgrade is the recommended type of upgrade.
Custom Upgrade                    A Custom Upgrade performs an upgrade of your existing Windows installation and enables you to customize the installation by: ¢ Changing the installation partition.
¢ Change the installation folder.
¢ Changing the language options.
¢ Converting the file system on the installation partition to NTFS.

Upgrading Computers Running Windows 98
Introduction                            You can begin the upgrade process after you have planned your installation and prepared your system. When upgrading from Windows 98, you must be aware of software compatibility.
Upgrade process                    To upgrade from Windows 98 to Windows XP Professional, perform the following steps:

  1. 1.         Insert the product CD.
  2. 2.         Select Install Windows XP.
  3. 3.         In the Installation Type box, verify that Upgrade (Recommended) is selected, and then click Next.
  4. 4.         Read and accept the licensing agreement.
  5. 5.         On the Product Key page, enter the product key found on the CD case, and then click Next.
    1. 6.         Specify any update packs that are required to make your applications work properly with Windows XP Professional.
    2. Update packs contain migration dynamic-link libraries (DLLs) that update an application so that it works in Windows XP Professional. They are available from software vendors.
  6. 7.         Select the partition on which to install Windows XP Professional.

If you are installing the system onto an existing FAT partition, specify whether you want to convert the partition to NTFS.
Important Windows XP Professional provides an uninstall tool for upgrades from Windows 98 on a drive formatted as FAT or FAT32. Therefore, when upgrading this type of drive, you will not have the option to upgrade to NTFS, as this would negate the uninstall option. However, you can convert the drive to NTFS after installation if you choose.
8. Review the upgrade report.
Setup generates an upgrade report to alert you to any compatibility problems. Every application on the computer is scanned for known problems, and upgrade packs are recommended as needed.
Note Stop the installation process only if the compatibility problems would prevent the user from operating the computer. In most cases, these errors are associated with a specific application, and you can resolve them after completing setup. You can print or save the upgrade report to help you resolve the errors after the upgrade is complete.

    1. 9. Join a domain.
    2. Client computers running Windows 98 do not have domain computer accounts. If the computer that is being upgraded is going to join a domain, a computer account must exist, or you must create the domain computer account.
  1. 10. Finish running the Setup program, which converts as much information as possible from the Windows 98 registry and installs Windows XP Professional.

When the upgrade is complete, log on as the Local Administrator to review any errors that may have occurred.
Upgrading Computers Running Windows 2000 or Windows NT Workstation 4.0 SP 5
Introduction                            Because Windows 2000, Windows NT Workstation 4.0 SP 5, and Windows XP Professional share common registry, file system, security, and operating system kernel structures, nearly all applications that run on Windows 2000 and Windows NT Workstation 4.0 SP 5 will run without modification on Windows XP Professional.
Upgrading from these operating systems to Windows XP Professional is easier than upgrading from other Windows operating systems because:
¢ Almost all peripherals and devices that work with Windows 2000 Professional and Windows NT Workstation 4.0 will work with Windows XP Professional.
¢ The version of NTFS used in Windows NT Workstation 4.0 is automatically upgraded to the version of NTFS used in Windows XP Professional during the upgrade process.
Note A few minor incompatibilities exist between the version of NTFS used in Windows NT Workstation 4.0 and the version of NTFS used in Windows 2000 and Windows XP Professional. For example, file system filters used by antivirus software and third-party networking software that were originally written for Windows NT no longer function between the two versions of the file system.
Upgrade process                    The upgrade process for client computers running Windows 2000 or Windows NT Workstation 4.0 SP 5 is similar to the upgrade process for client computers running Windows 98.
Note When upgrading from Windows NT Workstation, an administrator can install the operating system onto a converted NTFS partition.
To upgrade clients running Windows NT Workstation 4.0, perform the following tasks:

  1. 1.         Start the computer from the product CD.
  2. 2.         Select Upgrade to Windows XP Professional (Recommended) and then click Next.
  3. 3.         Read and accept the licensing agreement.
  4. 4.         If you are installing the system onto an existing FAT partition, specify whether you want to convert the partition to NTFS.

The files are copied, the computer restarts, and the upgrade finishes without further user intervention.
Important When upgrading from Windows 2000 to Windows XP Professional, you cannot reverse the upgrade. Therefore, after upgrading to Windows XP Professional, you can return to Windows 2000 only by reinstalling the product.
Installing Windows XP Professional in a Dual-Boot Configuration
Introduction                            A dual-boot configuration enables you to choose between two or more operating systems each time you start the computer. By using this type of configuration, you can run applications that are not compliant with Windows XP Professional on an existing operating system while using Windows XP Professional for all other applications.
Installing on the active partition
Installing on a partition other than the active partition
Important Some operating systems, such as MS-DOS, do not recognize partitions formatted with FAT32 or NTFS file systems. 
The active partition is the partition from which the computer starts, and it must be formatted with a file system that is recognized by both operating systems. For example, the active partition must be formatted with FAT when you have a dual-boot configuration with MS-DOS and Windows XP Professional, or FAT32 when you have a dual-boot configuration with Windows 98 and Windows XP Professional.
The other operating system must be installed first, and then you can install Windows XP Professional on the active partition or on another primary or extended partition. 
When you choose to install Windows XP Professional on a partition other than the active partition, Windows XP Professional will copy the necessary files to start the boot process to the active partition, which is referred to as the Windows XP Professional system partition. This enables Windows XP Professional to begin the boot process. The remainder of the operating system files will be copied to the non-active partition, which is referred to as the Windows XP Professional boot partition.
Lesson: Transferring User Settings and Files by Usingthe USMT
Introduction                            A user state on a computer consists of the user‘s files, operating system settings, and certain settings associated with applications. The User State Migration Tool (USMT) helps users and Information Technology (IT) professionals transfer the user‘s files and settings to a new computer running Windows XP Professional or to a new installation of Windows XP Professional on an existing computer. You can use the USMT to transfer the user state from a computer running Windows 95 or later to a computer running Windows XP Professional. 
Using the USMT enables IT professionals to quickly and easily include transfer of employee files and settings as a part of operating system deployment efforts or computer replacement. Consequently, users spend little or no time reconfiguring a new operating system or searching for lost files. Also, calls to the help desk regarding reconfiguration are reduced. The reduction in time for IT professionals, help desk staff, and users can significantly reduce the costs associated with deploying a new operating system or new computers. Additionally, using the USMT can reduce training costs and improve the user‘s experience with the new operating system by presenting a familiar, already configured operating system that requires little user adjustment.
Lesson objectives                   After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
¢ Describe the settings, folders, and file types that are transferred by default.
¢ Transfer a user state by using the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.
¢ Transfer a user state by using command-line tools.
¢ Change transferred files or settings by modifying the .inf files.
Settings, Folders, and File Types Transferred by Default
Introduction                            The following sections describe the files, folders, and settings that are transferred by default when you run the USMT. Note that by default the only application settings that are transferred are those for specific Microsoft applications. However, the USMT is fully customizable, and it is expected that most IT professionals will customize what is transferred.
Settings transferred by The following table contains the setting groups transferred by default. default
Accessibility Options Browser and Mail Settings Display Properties Folder and Taskbar Options Fonts Mouse and Keyboard Options Network Printers and Mapped Network Regional Settings
Drives
Microsoft Office Microsoft Excel Microsoft Outlook® Stored Mail and Contacts Microsoft Word Microsoft PowerPoint®
Folders transferred by The following table contains the folders transferred by default. default
My Documents Desktop My Pictures Favorites
File types transferred by File types are defined by their extensions. Files that have the following
default extensions are transferred to the new My Documents folder by default. If you
have applications that use files with different extensions and want them to be
migrated, you will need to modify the appropriate .inf file. This is covered later
in this module.
*.ch3 *.ppt *.csv *.pre *.dif *.rqy *.doc *.rtf *.dot *.scd *.dqy *.sh3 *.iqy *.txt *.mcw *.wpd *.oqy *.wps *.pot *.wq1 *.ppa *.wri *.pps *.xls
Transferring a User State by Using the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard
Introduction                            One method to transfer a user‘s state is by using the Files and Settings Transfer (FAST) Wizard. This wizard enables you to transfer the user‘s files, folders, and settings to a new computer or to do a clean installation of Windows XP Professional on an existing computer.
The wizard method is most likely to be used when you are replacing or performing a new installation of Windows XP Professional on a single computer, and when end users are responsible for upgrading their own operating systems.
Requirements

Note The FAST Wizard is designed to enable users to migrate settings and files to a new computer. If you are performing the migration, make sure that the users change their passwords the first time they log on to the new computer. This will ensure the users‘ files and settings will not be compromised.
Because previous versions of Windows do not contain the Files and Transfer Settings Wizard, you must have access to a computer running Windows XP Professional on which you can create a wizard disk, or have access to a Windows XP Professional installation CD, which contains the wizard as a choice during Setup. The wizard enables you to collect the files and settings to be transferred. The transferred data may be saved to either a server or removable media such as a disk or a CD. However, depending on the amount of data transferred, you may need a very large number of disks. If possible, you should save the data to a server or large-format removable media. 
Before beginning the transfer process to a new computer, you will need:
¢ A destination computer running Windows XP Professional.
¢ Space on a network share point to which both computers can gain access, or removable media on which to store the user‘s system state.
¢ A blank disk for the wizard, or a Windows XP Professional CD containing the wizard.
¢ The account name and password of the user whose state you are transferring, also called the migrating user.
Stages in the wizard-The process of transferring the user state to a new computer by using the wizard based transfer process occurs in three stages; however, note that Stage 1 occurs when you do not have
access to the Windows XP Professional installation CD.

  1. 1.         On the destination computer, you will log on as the migrating user, open the Files and Transfer Settings Wizard, and then create a Files and Transfer Settings Wizard disk. 
  2. 2.         On the source computer, you will log on as the migrating user, use the disk to run the wizard, and then store the user state on either a server or removable media.
  3. 3.         On the destination computer, you will complete the wizard to transfer the user state to the new computer.

Important This process transfers the state of only the user that is logged on. To transfer additional users‘ states from the same computer, you must repeat the process for each user.
During an upgrade from a previous version of Windows to Windows XP Professional, the user‘s state is automatically transferred, so there is no need to perform the steps in this topic. 
Transferring a User State by Using Command-Line Tools
Introduction                            Another way to transfer users‘ states is by using the command-line tools scanstate, which captures information, and loadstate, which restores or deploys information. This method can be used to transfer a single user‘s state or to transfer multiple users‘ states. 
If you are deploying Windows XP Professional on more than one computer at a time, use the command-line method. When you run the USMT as part of a mass installation, the scanstate and loadstate tools are included as batch files.
Requirements                          To transfer a single user‘s state to a new computer by using the command-line tools, you will need:
¢ A server to which both the source and destination computers can gain access, and which has adequate space to save the migrating user‘s state.
¢ A source computer containing an account for the user being transferred.
¢ A destination computer running Windows XP Professional that does not contain a profile for the user whose state you will be transferring.
¢ An account with administrative privileges on the destination computer. The account cannot have the same name as the migrating-user account.
¢ The account name and password of the user whose settings and files are to be transferred.
Note For detailed information about transferring users‘ states by using the command-line tools, see the Microsoft TechNet article —User State Migration in Windows XP“ at http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/ deploy/usermigr.mspx.
Changing Transferred Files or Settings by Modifying the .inf Files

Introduction                            The default file types, folders, and settings that are transferred by using the USMT can be altered or augmented by using .inf files.
If you want to add or remove file types, folders, or settings to be transferred, use Notepad to create an .inf file, and save that file in the USMT/Scan folder you created on the server. You then add the name of the .inf file that you have created to the default command line when you run Scanstate.exe.
Some of the additional objects that can be transferred include files, file types, folders, and registry keys or values.
Syntax                                      Inf scripts use an object specification syntax. The syntax is:
<obj type>, <object> [, <attribute> [, . . .]]
Note For more information about this process, see the Microsoft TechNet article —User State Migration in Windows XP“ at http://www.microsoft.com/ technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/deploy/usermigr.mspx
Lesson: Performing Post-Installation Tasks
Introduction                            When the installation of Windows XP Professional is complete, you must activate the product as an anti-piracy measure. In addition, it may be necessary to identify and resolve any installation errors that may occur.
Lesson objectives                   After completing this lesson, you will be able to: ¢ Activate Windows XP Professional. ¢ Troubleshoot failed installations.
Activating Windows XP Professional
Introduction                            Product Activation is an anti-piracy measure that will be included in all future Microsoft software applications. Anti-piracy measures protect organizations from having their software stolen. Windows XP Professional and Microsoft Office XP are the first applications to include mandatory activation.
The first time that a user logs on to a computer running Windows XP Professional, the Activate Windows dialog box appears, and the user is prompted to activate the installed copy of Windows XP Professional. A user can choose not to activate the software, in which case reminders to activate will periodically appear until the user activates the software.
Activation options                  The easiest way to activate the software is to select the Yes, let‘s activate Windows over the Internet now option, and then click Next. If the computer is not connected to the Internet, the user can instead select the telephone option and then follow the directions for activating Windows XP Professional over the telephone.
Important Users must activate Windows XP Professional within 30 days of installation. If not activated within 30 days, users are prevented from gaining access to Windows XP Professional until activation occurs.
Volume License Product       Users in large organizations can use a Volume License Product Key that will
Key                                            eliminate the need to individually activate each installation of Windows XP Professional. Additionally, users can automatically activate Windows XP Professional as part of an automated installation.
Note For more information about automated installations, see Module 2, —Automating an Installation of Windows XP Professional,“ in Course 2272, Implementing and Supporting Microsoft Windows XP Professional.
Checking for updates            As a best practice, after the product installation and activation is complete and you have an Internet connection available, you should connect to the Windows Update site to download and install any security patches that may be available for Windows XP. To connect to the Windows Update site, go to http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com/.
Troubleshooting Failed Installations
Introduction                            To troubleshoot a failed setup, you must recognize common setup errors and know their solutions.
Common setup errors           The following table lists common setup errors and possible solutions.
Problem                                Solution
CD errors Use a different Windows XP Professional CD. To request a replacement CD, contact Microsoft or your vendor.
Nonsupported CD-ROM Replace the CD-ROM drive with one that is supported. drive Try another method of installing Windows XP Professional, such as installing over the network, and then adding the CD-ROM driver.

Insufficient disk space

Use the Setup program to create a partition that uses existing free space on the hard disk. You can also delete and create partitions as necessary to create a partition that is large enough for installation.

Failure of dependency service to start

In the Windows XP Professional Setup Wizard, return to the Network Settings page and verify that you installed the correct protocol and network adapter. Verify that the network adapter has the proper configuration settings, such as transceiver type, and that the local computer name is unique on the network.

(continued) Problem Solution
Inability to connect to the domain controller
Failure of Windows XP Professional to install or start Verify that the domain name is correct and the IP address is
correct. Verify that the server running the DNS service and the domain controller are both online. If you cannot locate a domain controller, join a workgroup, and then join the domain after the installation.
Verify that the network adapter and protocol settings are set
correctly. If you are reinstalling Windows XP Professional and using the same computer name, delete and then recreate the computer account.
Verify that Windows XP Professional is detecting all of the hardware and that all of the hardware is listed on the HCL.

One Comment leave one →
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